Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station [The New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute]

Water Resources Research at New Jersey Academic Institutions and Other Programs


Table of Contents

Brookdale Community College Ocean Institute at Sandy Hook
Drew University Stream Macroinvertebrate Communities of Morris County
Montclair State University The Passaic River Institute
New Jersey Institute of Technology Continuous on-line water monitoring using membrane extraction, pervaporation, and high-performance liquid chromatography and other membrane extraction techniques
Richard Stockton College of NJ River Floodplain Geomorphologic Changes & Historical Land Use: the Oswego River
Richard Stockton College of NJ Great Egg Harbor River Research on Biomonitoring and Remediation
Rowan University Partnership in Lower Delaware Watersheds of Mantua Creek and Newton Creek
Rowan Univeristy Microbial Transformation in Bangladesh
Rutgers University Linking Atmospheric Processes and Surface/Subsurface Hydrology in the Climate System
Rutgers University LATTE: Transportation of Nutrients and Chemical Contaminants in the Hudson River Plume
Rutgers University Microbial Controls on the Mobilization and Speciation of Arsenic from Newark Basin Shale
Rutgers University

Water Resources Engineering Education and Research

Rutgers University Behavioral Ecology & Environmental Health Research
Stevens Institute of Technology Center for Maritime Systems
Stevens Institute of Technology NJ DEP's Total Maximum Daily Loads
The Wetlands Institute, Richard Stockton College of NJ, and others Coastal Conservation Research Program

 

Brookdale Community College
Lincroft, NJ

Brookdale Community College offers Teacher Training through its ESTUARIES, Watershed, Wetlands, and Water Testing programs at its Ocean Institute at Sandy Hook. Researchers have access to BCC facilities and boat trips, and also are currently working with the Monmouth County Vo-Tech program on a water testing project this year.

Contact Information:

Dave Grant, Director
Ocean Institute at Sandy Hook
53 Hudson Road - Sandy Hook
Highlands, NJ 07732

Back to Top

 

Drew University
Madison, NJ

Stream Macroinvertebrate Communities of Morris County, NJ

A water research project at Drew University focused on the analysis of stream macroinvertebrate communities as a measure of water quality in two watersheds in northern New Jersey. Between 2000 and 2005, researchers conducted annual surveys of 17 sampling sites spread among the five streams that collectively drain the Great Swamp watershed. Results may be viewed at the Ten Towns Committee Macroinvertebrate Sampling project website. This work was funded by the Ten Towns Great Swamp Management Committee.

Since 2001, the Rockaway River Watershed Cabinet has funded a parallel survey, performed at 14 sampling sites within the Rockaway River watershed. Five of these sites are located within the Rockaway River itself, while the remaining sites are found near the confluence of eight major tributaries with the Rockaway River.

Contact Information:

Professor Leland W. Pollock
Department of Biology
Drew University
Madison, NJ 07940
Telephone: (973) 408-3358; Fax: (973) 408-3824
Email: lpollock@drew.edu
Website: http://www.tentowns.org/10t/macroinv.htm

Back to Top

 The Passaic River Institute
Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ

The Passaic River Institute (PRI) promotes and conducts research, community outreach and educational programs to monitor, preserve and improve ecological and human health and welfare in the Passaic River watershed.

Research areas include contaminant biological uptake, ecotoxicology, pollutant fate, transport and distribution, ecosystem degradation and restoration, and effectiveness of environmental policy. PRI also develops scientific content for environmental education programs and supports science teachers in delivering this content. PRI cooperates and collaborates with public and private sectors including federal, state and local agencies, corporations, schools, and environmental advocacy groups. For a list of current and completed research projects, please visit the PRI Grants and Projects page.

Contact Information:

Dr. Kirk R. Barrett, PE, PWS
Director, Passaic River Institute
Montclair State University
College of Science & Mathematics
Montclair, NJ 07043
Telephone: (973) 655-7117; Fax: (973) 655-6810
Email: kirk.barrett@montclair.edu

Back to Top


New Jersey Institute of Technology
Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science
Newark, NJ

Researchers Dr. Xiaoyan Wang and Dr. Somenath Mitra developed a method for continuous on-line water monitoring by combining continuous liquid-liquid membrane extraction, membrane pervaporation and on-line high performance liquid chromatography that can be carried out without manual intervention. These steps perform extraction, concentration, and detection. This automated total analytical system has the capability to continuously monitoring trace analytes in water. A journal article on this research can be viewed by visiting the link below:

“Development of a total analytical system (TAS) by interfacing membrane extraction, pervaporation and high-performance liquid chromatography” Journal of Chromatography A, 1068 (2005) 237-242.

Professor Mitra's lab is also developing a method of gas injection membrane extraction (GIME) for measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water. For more information on this research, please visit Professor Mitra's Research Projects page.

Contact Information:

Professor Somenath Mitra
Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science
New Jersey Institute of Technology
Newark, NJ 07102
Telephone: (973) 596-5611
E-mail: mitra@njit.edu

Xiaoyan Wang
E-mail: xw2@njit.edu

Back to Top

 

Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Pomona, NJ

River Floodplain Geomorphologic Changes & Historical Land Use: the Oswego River

Between the 1750's and the 1880's a town, dam, reservoir, sawmill, bog iron ore beds, and an iron Furnace existed at Martha, currently a Pine Barrens ghost town.  Rosgen analysis, grain size analysis, topographic surveying, water table mapping, soil boring and peat depth determinations have been applied to determine the pre-development nature of the Oswego River floodplain and how land use changes in the vicinity of Martha altered the geomorphology of the Oswego River. A paper presented at The Seventh International Conference on HydroScience and Engineering, titled Stream Restoration under "natural" conditions: the Oswego River at Martha Furnace, provides an overview of the research results thusfar.

Contact Information:

Dr. Claude Epstein
Professor of Environmental Studies
Richard Stockton College
Pomona, NJ 08240-0195
Telephone: (609) 652-4611
Email: Claude.Epstein@stockton.edu

Back to Top



Great Egg Harbor River Research on Biomonitoring and Remediation

Adams Branch Remediation Study
funded by NJDEP, April 2004

Adams Branch is a small tributary stream of the Great Egg Harbor River, located in Hamilton Township, Atlantic County. The drainage basin of this stream, with an area of 1608 acres, has been heavily developed since the 1950’s, with major facilities including the Atlantic City Race Course, Hamilton Mall, and condominiums.

The goal of the Adams Branch Remediation Study is to characterize stormwater control and water quality problems in Adams Branch, Great Egg Harbor River watershed, and to develop a preliminary plan for mitigation of those problems. The project is a partnership between the Richard Stockton College of NJ, the Great Egg Harbor Watershed Association, and NJDEP. Other cooperating agencies are Atlantic County Division of Regional Planning and Economic Development, the Township of Hamilton and the NJ Pinelands Commission.

Contact Information:

Dr. Jamie Cromartie

NAMS
Richard Stockton College
PO Box 195
Pomona, NJ 08240
Telephone: (609) 652-4413; Fax: (609) 626-5515
E-mail: jamie.cromartie@stockton.edu

Back to Top

  

Rowan University
Glassboro, NJ

Rowan University and US EPA in Partnership on Two Local Creeks

Rowan University received funding from the USEPA for watershed assessment of two local creeks in the state. The project draws on two creeks in watershed management area (WMA) 18 in New Jersey. This lower Delaware River WMA encompasses eleven watersheds. Both of the selected projects are in close proximity to the main Glassboro campus and Camden Campus of Rowan University. One project in the Boroughs of Glassboro and Pitman focuses on the Chestnut Branch of the Mantua Creek. This creek is of environmental importance because it is the headwaters for Alcyon Lake in Pitman, NJ, and flows adjacent to the nearby LiPari Landfill superfund site. The other, in Waterfront South in the City of Camden, is close to another superfund site, the Welsbach and General Gas Mantle Company. Both projects seek to improve water quality in the watersheds through collaborative partnerships between Rowan University, municipalities on the stream, and local K-12 schools.

The project is multidisciplinary in nature and requires expertise from various disciplines. Tasks included watershed characterization through hydrologic and water quality assessment and modeling. Water quality parameters being monitored include pH, DO, temperature, solids, organics, chlorophyll A, bacteria, metals and nutrients (nitrate and phosphate). NJWRRI intern A. Ayotomein was responsible for analyses of chlorophyll A, fecal coliform and nutrients. Three sites (upstream, midstream and downstream) were selected for study for each water body. Three sampling events have been conducted so far for the two water bodies. Trips to the Newton creek site in close proximity to the superfund cleanup indicated presence of litter. The midstream site near Collingswood, NJ showed profuse growth of aquatic planktons in the months of June and July. Stream bank erosion was also visible. The Chestnut branch showed lesser degrees of litter and bank erosion. Nutrient data indicated that both water bodies are being impacted by nonpoint source pollution as evidenced by high nitrate and phosphate concentrations. These high concentrations also explain the profuse plankton growth that was observed at certain sites. Nitrate and phosphate are typically discharged in rainfall events from fertilizers, detergents and agricultural runoff. High fecal coliform levels were determined in both creeks. The water quality is deemed unacceptable for partial body contact. Chlorophyll A concentrations were also elevated in Newton Creek. This project allowed the intern to gain experience in field measurements and also community outreach. A technical paper and presentation were also part of this research.

Contact Information:

Professor Kauser Jahan
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering  
Rowan University
Glassboro, NJ 08028
Telephone: (856) 256-5323
@rowan.edu

Back to Top

Microbial Transformation of Arsenic
Bangladesh

A team of four Rowan University students from the Colleges of Engineering and Liberal Arts and Sciences were led by Professor Kauser Jahan of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Dr. Jahan has taken initiative in arsenic research as Bangladesh has one of the world’s worst cases of arsenic contaminated groundwater. The arsenic is naturally occurring and has impacted millions of Bangladeshis. Dr. Jahan received funding from the American Institute of Bangladesh Studies to lead a team of students to Bangladesh. Three engineering students and one Biology student accompanied her on the trip.

The major objectives of the trip were to present their research findings to the Bangladeshi researchers at the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET) and the International University of Bangladesh (IUB) and to observe arsenic mitigation projects. The trip included seminars, presentations, sightseeing tours and observation of poverty elimination and arsenic mitigation programs. Seminars included presentations and exchange of research ideas on arsenic remediation.

Discussions with BUET and IUB faculty indicated that the country was poised for abandoning all shallow tube wells and tapping into deeper aquifers for arsenic free water withdrawal. Research currently is focused more on the fate and transport of arsenic in the soil and edible crops and plants. The team also visited a BRAC arsenic mitigation project that currently helps a community to pump water from a deep groundwater well for distribution. Poor people have access to this water through community taps available at public schools.

Contact Information:

Professor Kauser Jahan
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering  
Rowan University
Glassboro, NJ 08028
Telephone: (856) 256-5323
E-mail: jahan@rowan.edu

Back to Top

 Rutgers University
New Brunswick , NJ

 Linking Atmospheric Processes and Surface/Subsurface Hydrology
in the Climate system

Rutgers Researchers Christopher P. Weaver and Alan Robock (Department of Environmental Sciences and the Center for Environmental Prediction), and Ying Fan Reinfelder (joint between Geology and Environmental Sciences, and also a member of the Center for Environmental Prediction) are working on an initiative to link atmospheric processes and surface/subsurface hydrology in the climate system. This project has just received funding from the NSF.

ABSTRACT:

The terrestrial water cycle consists of multiple interacting reservoirs, including the atmosphere, the soil-vegetation system, rivers, streams, and other forms of surface water, and groundwater. All of these components have been affected by climate change in the past, and will continue to be so affected into the future. Before we can predict future changes in the water resources that are so critical for healthy human communities and ecosystems, we must face three challenges.

First, we must develop a theoretical framework that emphasizes the continuous cycling of water through all the land and atmospheric reservoirs of the terrestrial water cycle and allows us to study the dynamical interactions among these reservoirs over a wide range of space and time scales. In other words, we need to study climate and hydrology together, not as isolated components, emphasizing the linkages among all the reservoirs. Therefore, we must develop integrated tools to study joint climatic and hydrologic responses.

Second, using these new tools, we must achieve greater understanding of the mechanisms that drive changes in these reservoirs over different space and time scales so that we can quantify potential changes in, e.g., the amount of water in our lakes and rivers, the extent of our wetlands, and the amount of water in and rate of replenishment of our aquifers as a result of climate change. In other words, we must gain the ability to translate climate change into hydrologic change.

Third, we must build into this scientific framework the ever-increasing human influences, occurring at global and regional scales, that may strongly affect climate and the terrestrial water cycle. The current approach to regional climate downscaling and climate change impacts on the terrestrial water cycle, i.e., the practice of decoupling the fundamental reservoirs, does not permit us to address these issues.

Therefore, in the proposed study, we intend to adopt a new approach, embodied in a new modeling tool. The interdisciplinary project team has recently built a new modeling system for exploring coupled climatic-hydrologic processes by fully integrating all surface and subsurface terrestrial reservoirs, and their governing dynamics, into a state-of-the-art regional climate model, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). With this tool, i.e., RAMS-Hydrology, the project team now has a unique ability to produce downscaled scenarios of regional climate change impacts on the terrestrial water cycle and investigate the two-way interactions between the atmospheric, surface, and subsurface reservoirs that modulate these impacts.

The work proposed here is to combine this new downscaling tool with our best understanding of large-scale climate variability over the past decades, and our best estimates of the range of potential global climate changes in the future, to examine coupled climate and water cycle change over North America in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Contact Information:

Christopher P. Weaver
Assistant Research Professor
Department of Environmental Sciences
Associate Director, Center for Environmental Prediction
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
14 College Farm Road
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8551
E-mail: weaver@cep.rutgers.edu
Website: www.envsci.rutgers.edu/~weaver

Back to Top

LAgrangian Transport and Transformation Experiment (LATTE)

Robert Chant1, John Reinfelder1, Scott Glenn1, Oscar Schofield1, John Wilkin1, Robert Houghton2, Bob Chen3, Meng Zhou3, Paul Bissett4, Mark Moline5, Tom Frazer6

1Rutgers, 2Lamont-Doherty, 3U. Mass Boston , 4FERI, 5Calpoly, 6U. Fla. Gainesville

LATTE is a coordinated program of field and numerical experiments to examine processes that control the fate and transport of nutrients and chemical contaminants in the Hudson River plume, a plume that emanates from one of the nation’s most urban estuaries -- the New York/New Jersey Harbor complex. Urban estuarine plumes represent a major pathway for the transport of nutrients and chemical contaminants to the coastal ocean. The fate and transport of this material is controlled not only by the plumes dynamics but also by biological and chemical processes that are coupled to the dynamics of the plume. By conducting a series of dye experiments featuring continuous underway chemical and biological sampling with a state-of-the-art towed vehicle within the well sampled framework of an operational ocean observatory, we will be able to distinguish between physical processes that transport/mix material in a buoyant plume from biological and chemical transformation processes. This will allow us to quantify biological and chemical interactions in a Lagrangian perspective, and provide a means to assess their importance in determining the fate and transport of nutrients and chemical contaminants in a buoyant plume.

LATTE will contrast the response of physical, biological, and chemical processes in the Hudson plume during upwelling and downwelling conditions. We hypothesize that cross-shelf transport of material is determined not only by Ekman transport and diapycnal mixing, but also by biological and chemical processes all of which differ between upwelling and downwelling conditions. For example, a vertically thin plume during upwelling conditions will have enhanced light levels, thus promoting biological production and potentially increasing the rate that chemical contaminants enter the food chain. In particular, we will quantifiably relate (a) biological production rates, (b) the bioavailability and bio-accumulation of metals, and (c) chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) photobleaching rates within the plume to the physical characteristics of the plume, such as plume thickness, optical depth, and mixing rates.

LATTE will also utilize the Rutgers University Coastal Ocean Observing Laboratory (R.U. COOL) to facilitate interpretation of the dye study by placing results from Lagrangian perspective in context with shelf-wide observations from satellite imagery, surface currents (CODAR) and far-field subsurface hydrography from a fleet of gliders. The observatory will be augmented by a cross shelf array of moored instruments to provide detailed estimates of subtidal circulation, stratification and estimates of turbulence production. Finally, data-assimilative numerical simulations will provide high resolution and realistic hindcasts of the coastal ocean during the field experiments. Modeling will pioneer the assimilation of dye-tracer data into a 3-D coastal circulation model and guide future efforts to assimilate other tracers into circulation models with complex sources and sinks. Coupled physical/biological model hindcasts will be used to interpolate observations in space and time for interpretation, and to test turbulent and biological parameterizations.

During the late spring/early summer of 2003 we conducted hydrographic surveys in the plume and to test several of the sampling systems. In June 2003, Bob Chen used the ecoshuttle, one of the centerpiece of LATTE’s, to map out CDOM in the Hudson and within its plume on the shelf. Scott Glenn and Oscar Schofield have refocused the Rutgers University Coastal Ocean Observatory Laboratory (RU COOL) on the Bight Apex with the installation of a nested grid of CODAR units that will be augmented by partners at Stevens Institute of Technology. Glenn and Schofield will continue the development and testing of the web glider and oversee the installation of an X-BAND dish at Rutgers to track the international constellation of satellites. In May of 2004 we conducted a pilot study consisting of two surface dye injections that were tracked over four days and carried out continuous under-way biological and chemical sampling. We will conduct the main experiments in May 2005 & May 2006 with each year featuring two dye experiments.

Results from LATTE will link nutrient inputs from the estuary to coastal phytoplankton blooms that may drive recurrent low dissolved oxygen levels in this region. LATTE will improve our ability to predict the fate and transport of contaminants and the rate that they enter the base of the food chain in the coastal ocean. Quantifying contaminant uptake into the base of the coastal ocean food chain is the first step in predicting contaminant bioaccumulation at higher tropic levels. Finally, results from this study could guide ongoing discussions by New York City government officials on future strategies for sewage disposal.

LATTE will also provide traditional research and thesis opportunities for a state-funded Ph.D. program and NOAA-funded undergraduate internships. Moreover, it will provide focus for the first 5 years a new Masters in Operational Oceanography program initiated in 2002 by project PI’s. Finally, ongoing collaboration with the Mid-Atlantic Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (MA-COSEE) will be strengthened by adding components on biological and chemical processes in buoyant river plumes. MA-COSEE integrates oceanographic research and education programs to audiences that include coastal managers, K-12 teachers and their students--especially underrepresented groups in the marine science.

Contact Information:

John Reinfelder
Department of Environmental Sciences
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
Telephone: (732) 932-9800 x6211
Email: reinfelder@envsci.rutgers.edu

Back to Top

Microbial Controls on the Mobilization and Speciation of Arsenic
from Newark Basin Shale

John Reinfelder and Lily Young
Dept of Environmental Sciences
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

The North American Rift Basin spans part of New Jersey ( Newark Basin ) and has arsenic containing red, gray and black shale. In a recent study conducted by the NJ Geological Survey, it was determined that 15-30% of the wells from this area had arsenic levels exceeding 10 µg/L and up to 215 µg/L. The pyrite in these formations contain up to 4% arsenic. Hematite is also potentially a source of arsenic to the groundwater. Arsenic mobilization, then, could be due to the oxidation of pyrite in black and gray shale, and/or release of arsenic from hematite or other iron oxides in red shale (Serfes et al, 2004). Although chemical and physical processes play a role in the weathering of these minerals, there is also evidence that microorganisms may be essential to the process.

The goal of this project is to examine the role microorganisms play in the mobilization and speciation of arsenic in the Newark Basin and its groundwater.

Three objectives will be undertaken:

1)To compare the community structure (using denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clonal libraries) of attached and suspended microorganisms associated with gray/black shale and with red shale found in the Newark Basin .

It is hypothesized that pyrite and associated aquifers will have a different microbial community structure than hematite impacted ones. Furthermore, these differences will help us identify the specific organisms critical to arsenic mobilization.

2) To examine the degree to which microbes enhance arsenic mobilization at ambient (circumneutral) pH from native pyrite and hematite. It is proposed that iron oxidizers facilitate the release of arsenic from pyrite and that iron reducers may mobilize arsenic from hematite under anoxic conditions. In addition, it is proposed that arsenic oxidizers and reducers are active in controlling the relative abundance of As(V) and As(III) and thereby affecting arsenic transport and distribution. The organisms involved in arsenic mobilization and speciation will be identified and characterized.

3) To identify iron utilizing microbes associated with the pyrite and/or hematite shale and arsenic utilizing microbes involved in the speciation of arsenic from the Newark Basin using biomolecular markers based on 16S rDNA sequence. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) will be used to observe the spatial distribution of both iron and arsenic active microbes on surfaces of black and red shale. It is proposed that the organisms will associate with specific minerals in the shale, for example, iron oxidizers will attach to pyrite and arsenite oxidizers will be associated with As(V)-enriched iron oxides. Understanding the role that the microbial community plays in mobilizing As from the geologic media will constitute a new contribution to our basic knowledge of biogeological weathering and trace element cycling in the earth’s environment.

Arsenic has emerged as a serious health concern in the U.S. and worldwide. Understanding the processes that lead to the mobilization of arsenic from naturally-enriched minerals is essential to predicting and protecting the quality of drinking water supplies. Although this project is directed at the arsenic issue in the Newark Basin in New Jersey , the Eastern Rift Basin of North America is a major formation in the mid-Atlantic and northeast region of the US and other similar sedimentary basins around the world are sources of drinking water. The project will support and train a graduate student and a post-doc and will support an undergraduate researcher.

Contact Information:

John Reinfelder
Department of Environmental Sciences
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
Telephone: (732) 932-9800 x6211
Email: reinfelder@envsci.rutgers.edu

Back to Top

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Busch Campus, Piscataway, NJ


Water Resources Engineering Education and Research
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
School of Engineering
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Busch Campus, Piscataway, NJ

Rutgers University’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) has an active program in the area of water resources and environmental engineering. This includes tenured and tenured-track, adjunct, and research faculty in the areas of potable and wastewater, surface and stormwater management, groundwater contamination and remediation, bioreactor engineering, and environmental chemistry. The current faculty and its graduate and undergraduate students engage in modeling efforts, laboratory analysis, and implementation of innovative techniques using field studies.

The Water Resources and Environmental Engineering program provides students the opportunity to study a broad range of topics related to environmental problems, and to pursue advanced research in specific areas of interest, with a focus on the application of modern quantitative techniques to practical problems in environmental engineering. The program educates engineers who will solve environmental and water resources problems by applying fundamental principles from natural sciences, mathematics, mechanics and other underlying disciplines. Students are provided with the fundamentals so they will be prepared to solve both current and future environmental problems. To achieve this objective, the program offers a breadth of possible research and study areas.

Equipment and Facilities

The Rutgers Hydroinformatics Laboratory (Dr. Qizhong Guo, Director) was established through Rutgers University SROA Program. Its goal is to improve management of water resources from technical and business sectors. Hydroinformatics integrates understanding of water quantity and water quality measurable parameters with IT sensors and software. The hydroinformatics laboratory builds capability for computer simulation of complex urban water systems. Benefits include advance warning of flood and drought conditions, and real-time control of water infrastructure systems.

Environmental technologies are based increasingly on molecular and nanoscale regimes because of complex chemical, physical and biological processes influencing a wide diversity of Earth systems. Consequently, high technology solutions to environmental problems often require scientific and engineering technologies centered on a process level understanding of complex chemical and physical interactions at the molecular level. The research programs using the Complex Mixture Analytical Facility (Dr. Monica Mazurek, Director) also support environmental goals for New Jersey , and provide undergraduate and graduate training for environmental and chemical engineering students, contributing to a highly skilled engineering workforce. The Subsurface Contamination Research and Teaching Laboratory (SCRaTL, Dr. Kenneth Lee, Director) contains state-of-the-art equipment for research and instructions. SCRaTL is equipped with three gas chromatographs (GSs), a total organic carbon (TOC) meter, a dissolved oxygen (DO) meter, a pH meter, a conductivity meter, a pilot-scaled photo-chemical remediation reactor, and numerous computers.

The Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Laboratory (Dr. Qizhong Guo, Director) contains state-of-the-art equipment for instructions and research. Three multipurpose hydraulic benches are equipped with attachments designed to demonstrate the basic principles of mass, momentum, and energy conservation and transfer. A tilting flume is available for similar experiments and demonstrations. Apparatus to study hydrology and sediment transport are also available.

Research Projects (Current and Recent)

  • Development of a Numerical Model to Assess the Impacts of Raw Water Quality on Conventional Drinking Water Treatment, sponsored by New Jersey Dept of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) (Q. Guo, PI)
  • Water Quality Modeling Study of Lower Maurice River Estuary, sponsored by Township of Commercial , NJ (Q. Guo, PI)
  • Study of Sewer and Storage Tank Sediment Flushing Device, sponsored by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and USInfrastructure, Inc. (Q. Guo, PI)
  • Implementation of Stormwater Detention Basin Retrofitting Techniques, sponsored by NJ DEP (Q. Guo, PI).
  • Nitrogen Flux through Barnegat Inlet, sponsored by New Jersey Sea Grant and National Science Foundation (NSF), in collaboration with Rutgers Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences (IMCS) (Q. Guo, PI).
  • Destruction of Volatile Organic Compounds Using the Photo-chemical Remediation Reactor, sponsored by New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute (NJWRRI) and Energia Inc., in collaboration with Rutgers Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department (CBE) (K. Lee, PI).
  • Use of Hydrogen Release Compounds for PCE Enhanced Biodegradation in Fractured Rock Aquifers, sponsored by Rutgers Environmental Health and Safety and NJWRRI (K. Lee, PI).
  • Development of Polar Atmospheric Organic Compounds: Development of a Molecular Level Analytical Capability Using LC/MS APESI, sponsored by NSF (M. Mazurek, PI).
  • Biocomplexity: The Roles of Resources, Competition, and Predation in Microbial Degradation of Organic Matter, sponsored by NSF, in collaboration with Rutgers IMCS, Environmental Sciences Dept (Cook College) and CBE (M. Mazurek, Co-PI).

Contact Information:

Qizhong (George) Guo
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
School of Engineering
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Email: qguo@rci.rutgers.edu

Back to top

 Rutgers University
Newark, NJ

Summary of research projects in the Laboratory of Professor Judith Weis:

  • Behavioral ecology of fiddler crabs (Uca pugnax) from contaminated and reference sites
  • Behavioral ecology of blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) from contaminated and reference sites
  • Environmental and reproductive health of white perch (Morone americana ) from the Hackensack River estuary
  • Behavioral and other interactions of invasive crabs species (Carcinus maenas and Hemigrapsus sanguineus) with the native, commercially important blue crab (Callinectes sapidus)
  • Parasite abundance and diversity in different populations of killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus

Contact Information:

Dr. Judith Weis
Rutgers University
Newark, NJ
Telephone: (973) 353-5387 or (973) 353-1316
Fax: (973) 353-5518
Email: jweis@andromeda.rutgers.edu

Back to Top

 

Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken, NJ

The Center for Maritime Systems
"
Working to preserve and secure our nation’s maritime resources
Education, Research and Service to the Nation"

The Center for Maritime Systems of Stevens Institute of Technology is a uniquely collaborative and multi-disciplinary environment in which academic researchers and the maritime community work together to address the issues affecting the health, both economic and environmental, and the physical security of ports and waterways worldwide. The focus of the activities involves marine craft hydrodynamics, observing systems, environment modeling, acoustic detection, and port security and commerce.

Today, the Center for Maritime Systems (CMS) housed in the Davidson Laboratory. The Davidson Laboratory, founded in 1935, is one of the largest and most renowned hydrodynamic and ocean engineering research facilities in the nation. It was featured in the February 1996 issue of Sea Technology and has been designated an International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark. Marine craft hydrodynamic fundamentals and operational control issues have been investigated at the Davidson Laboratory for over 70 years. Efforts focus upon hull designs and survivable systems integration and automation in crafts ranging from high-speed planning boats to submarines. The emphasis of the research is on high-speed and low-wake vessel dynamics including physical model and full-scale field studies of high-speed ferry designs, including resistance tests, seakeeping studies, and wake characterization. Contributions to the field of ocean engineering include wave tank simulations of various sea states and the analysis of forces on offshore structures.

The primary research facilities are two unique tanks. The first is a high-speed towing tank with a length of 313 feet, width of 12 feet and a variable water depth to 6 feet. A monorail-supported cable-driven carriage is capable of speeds up to 100 ft/sec. The tank also contains a programmable wave maker capable of generating monochromatic and random wave fields, as well as several types of wave spectra. The second tank is a rotating arm and oblique-sea basin, with dimensions of 75-feet-long by 75-feet-wide and a variable water depth to five feet.

Observing system research involves designing sensors to measure specific water properties or processes and developing arrays of sensors to monitor a region of the marine environment. Pure and applied estuarine and coastal processes research is accomplished using physical models in the towing tanks, computer modeling studies, and site-specific field studies. Estuarine and coastal field research is accomplished through the use of the CMS’s two research vessels, equipped with advanced global positioning systems, radar and 1-ton deployment winches. Research instrumentation includes topographic and bathymetric surveying equipment, a CODAR high frequency radar system, Acoustic Doppler Current Meters, PUV meters, laser-based Suspended Sediment Particle-size Distribution Meters and a Turner-design fluorometry system. In addition to the mobile research instrumentation, the CMS maintains a host of in-situ instrument platforms that automatically monitor weather and water conditions along the New Jersey Coast (sql.dl.stevens-tech.edu) and in New York/New Jersey Harbor as part of the New York Harbor Observing System (NYHOS).

Environment modeling at the Center for Maritime Systems is designed to take advantage of the rapidly evolving high performance computational and communications technologies. A wide range of models and processing tools, including visualization and animation routines, are constantly being developed and applied to problems associated with port security, beach erosion, marine construction and operations, oil and gas exploration, water quality, sediment and contaminant transport, municipal and industrial intakes/outfalls, off_shore dumping and storm surges. In place, nowcast/forecast systems for several estuaries and coastal oceans, that combine computer models with real-time information, for assessing existing water and sediment characteristics, are being constantly refined to provide the most accurate realizations possible of the marine environment. The information produced by these systems is used to predict future conditions under different contaminant loading and forcing scenarios.

The basis of the environment modeling systems is POM, The Princeton Ocean Model. POM is a state of the art, generalized coordinate, free surface, primitive equation coastal ocean model.ECOMSED, an estuarine derivative of POM is the central modeling component of the CMS’s New York Harbor Observing and Prediction System (NYHOPS). Computational recourses center around the CMS’s cluster: 14 dual 2.8 GHz Xeon processors, and 11 3.2GHz P4. . A production graphics system is implemented in Matlab, generating 6000 images per nightly forecast. We will soon be replacing the matlab with higher-quality Java and OpenGL visualization, generating approximately 9000 images per forecast cycle (which will eventually increase in frequency to a 6-hour cycle).

Data assimilation is performed on model output to yield the current “best estimate” as to present conditions in water elevation, temperature, salinity, currents, and wind. The frequency of realtime graphing is currently every 30 minutes, and will shortly increase to every 5 minutes.

Acoustic detection research focuses on the development of innovating sensing technologies based on the nonlinear interaction of acoustic and vibration energy in various media and materials. Examples include detection and identification of buried landmines, nondestructive evaluation of structural and material integrity, medical diagnostics, etc. The acoustic division possesses state-of-the art equipment, such as multi-channel signal analyzers, data acquisition and processing systems, wide range of sound and vibration measuring and generating instrumentation, including unique non-contact ultrasonic, microwave, as well as scanning laser-doppler vibrometers. Port security and commerce initiatives build on the existing and planned sensor technologies, data assimilation/analysis tools and integrated model forecasting and systems-level research capabilities of Stevens Institute of Technology and the Center for Maritime Systems, as well as resources and partners from the surrounding military and maritime business infrastructure in the Port of New York and New Jersey .

Maritime security studies focus on safe navigation practices and real-time surveillance of the maritime environment and vessels in shallow coastal and estuary regions through the use of modern radar systems. Environment nowcast/forecast systems are developed to predict future conditions for a variety of environmental “threats”, including intentional and accidental releases of hazardous materials. These systems identify to technology-oriented and business practices-oriented solutions to the security problems faced by the commercial and military maritime sectors.

The research efforts of the Center for Maritime Systems are supported by an Instrumentation and Design Group that designs and manufactures the specialized equipment needed to support research activities. The Center houses the New Jersey State Coastal Protection Technical Assistance Service (CPTAS) created to inform and counsel New Jersey citizens and government officials regarding coastal protection technology and the Stevens – New Jersey Sea Grant College Program’s Cooperative Extension in Coastal Processes created to promote the sustainability and wise use of our coastal resources through public outreach and education.

An extensive expansion of the Davidson Laboratory and a waterfront presence for The Center for Maritime Systems is currently being planned. The new facilities are scheduled for completion in the 2004/2005 time frame. These facilities will include: 1. Advanced hydromechanics research facility consisting of state-of –the-art towing tanks and computational systems, supporting leading-edge research into marine craft dynamics, coastal and estuary processes and modeling, and the design of ocean observing systems. 2. Offices and classrooms for researchers and staff.

3. A state-of-the-art public outreach center that will describe the history of the Port, the ecological, cultural and economic importance of estuaries, and the status of ongoing efforts to better understand, restore and preserve these vital ecosystems.

4. Deepwater dock and shore-side facilities will support the Stevens research vessels and visiting vessels from other oceanographic research institutions.
Website links:

www.stevens.edu/cms/
www.stevens.edu/cms
www.stevens.edu/maritimeforecast/
http://cmn.dl.stevens-tech.edu/

Contact Information:

Alan F. Blumberg, Ph. D.
Deputy Director, Center for Maritime Systems
Stevens Institute of Technology
Castle Point on Hudson
Hoboken, NJ 07030
Telephone: (201) 216-5289; Fax: (201) 216-8214
Email: ablumber@stevens.edu

Web: http://www.soe.stevens-tech.edu/ceoe/People/blumberg.html
Website: http://www.stevens.edu/maritimeforecast/

Back to Top

Stevens Institute of Technology supports development of TMDLs

Stevens Institute of Technology is providing the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) with services to support the development of Total Maximum Daily Loads. The project to provide this support is coordinated by Dr. David A. Vaccari of the Stevens Center for Environmental Systems (CES), with Prof. Richard I. Hires as co-PI of the project. The scope of this particular project incorporates both a research aspect and a TMDL aspect. The research aspect is the development of an approach for computing TMDLs for water bodies that are influenced by combined sewer outfalls (CSOs). In a future project the scope will be expanded to include tidally-influenced water bodies. The TMDL development aspect of this project is the application of the CSO approach to a portion of the Passaic River  from the confluence with the Goffle Brook to the Dundee Dam.

Contact Information:

David A. Vaccari, Ph.D., P.E., DEE, Assoc. Professor
Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Ocean Engineering
Stevens Institute of Technology
Castle Point-on-the-Hudson, Hoboken, NJ 07030
Telephone: (201) 216-5570; Fax: (201) 216-5352
Website: http://personal.stevens.edu/~dvaccari/

Back to Top

The Wetlands Institute, Richard Stockton College, and Other Partners

Coastal Conservation Research Program
Stone Harbor, NJ

The Coastal Conservation Research Program (CCRP) is the outgrowth of a research program initiated in 1989 at the Wetlands Institute on the Cape May Peninsula of southernmost New Jersey. Located on 6,000 acres of coastal salt marsh, the Wetlands Institute promotes research, education, and conservation through a variety of methods including classes, field research, and local community involvement. The CCRP is a partnership between the Wetlands Institute, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey (RSC), and other public and private partners.

 

Contact Information:

Dan McLaughlin, Program Coordinator
Telephone: (609) 368-1211; Fax: (609) 368-3871
Email: research@wetlandsinstitute.org

Back to Top

Useful Links

-----